Guest Post: My Path Through Math

There is an administrative assistant at AcerPlacer who loves sharing the story of her journey through math with students. Today, she was kind enough to write her experience so that everyone could see it.

If you think back to your very first day of college and the first classroom that you walked in to, how did you feel? Excited, overwhelmed,​ ​or amazed you made it to the right classroom? As you searched for what will be your unspoken assigned seat and looked around the classroom, what did you notice first? For me, I realized on the first day that there is nothing like the feeling of dread when you realize the class has 30+ students all in one space. How is the teacher going to help you if you have questions about the material, or just need some extra help?

While this may not have been your first college classroom experience, it was for me. I double-checked and even toured the campus before the semester started to make sure I knew where I was going (still got lost), I bought all my books early, and was ready to start my classes. I ended up in the engineering building and wandered into an advanced math class that made me run for the hills like the room was on fire. After what felt like an eternity, I eventually found my first class of the day — math. As if that wasn’t alarming enough, I walked in late and had to pick a random seat next to a stranger. At least my best friend was three seats down and looked just as panicked as I felt.

His expression and my feeling of alarm seemed justified. Just about everyone we knew had enrolled into a similar class or the class just one level higher. “Two-thirds of the students at community colleges, and 4 in 10 of those at four-year institutions take remedial courses. Math is a much bigger sand trap than English: Far more postsecondary students fall into remedial math than reading, and fewer move on to credit-bearing courses” (Gewertz, 2018).

Knowing that I wasn’t a mathematician, I thought to myself, “Here we go.” I was enrolled in the lowest level of math offered on campus. Could I do this? I could do this, right? As I sat down and unpacked my new school supplies, I looked around the room. I had an idea of what the college classrooms looked like, and it didn’t look like this room. What alarmed me the most about my new math class was that there were easily 35 students. All in the same room. With one teacher. In a math class.

Adelman (1999) states: “Of all pre-college curricula, the highest level of mathematics one studies in secondary school has the strongest continuing influence on bachelor’s degree completion. Finishing a course beyond the level of Algebra-2 (e.g. trigonometry or pre-calculus) more than doubles the odds that a student who enters postsecondary education will complete a bachelor’s degree” (p.vii).

Based on the study referenced above I was in big trouble. Math in high school was easy for me because I wasn’t required to take it during my junior or senior year. The last class that I was required to take was Algebra 2, and to be honest, I had no idea what was going on during the entire class. It was a miracle that I passed. Starting out in a new class, I felt that I could finish my math and avoid the so-called “sand trap”. I was going to do it. At least that was what I thought. I was in for a very rough semester.

Math was proving to be very difficult for me, and it was the class that I found myself dreading. In the upcoming semesters, I tried everything from traditional classes, computer-based classes, and even sought help from resources offered at my university. I just could not wrap my brain around this math thing. I had amazing professors who would help when they could, but I started to feel like a burden. I just could not understand what they were telling me or why we were moving “x” to the right side of the equation. What was factoring and why is this 3 all the sudden a negative number? I stopped asking questions. I came to the conclusion that I hated math. I hated all the rules, classes, material. All of it. It was the class I hated to attend, and even register for.

I learned that anytime I asked my family or friends for help that it only caused me more confusion and frustration. I found that not everyone who is wonderful at doing math can actually teach math. After a handful of math classes (13 to be exact), I found myself with a degree that was completed but out of reach because of my math requirements. How could I enjoy and pass higher level courses but not pass my math classes?! I felt defeated and hated to admit that math was again a class I had to repeat.

“Large numbers of students have been prevented from pursuing careers they’re interested in because of the math,” said Briars, a math consultant who was the president of the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics from 2014 to 2016. “They’re underprepared, but they’re put into the typical course sequence anyway. And we’ve done this at the expense of other mathematics, like quantitative literacy, or statistics, that is vitally important, and maybe more important for some careers” (Gewertz, 2018).

When you reflect on your previous classes, what made the class enjoyable? What made you successful in the class? Was there something in particular that stood out? For me, that answer is simple. I needed a small class that allowed me to ask questions and receive personalized help. I needed to be one of a handful of students, not one of 30+. I needed a class that had an uplifting, positive feel to it that encouraged mistakes and provided hands-on learning with an instructor who was invested not only in the topic, but also my success.

After what seemed like a never-ending nightmare of failed math classes, I had a degree that was one class away from being 100% completed and a job that only offered advancement if you possessed a degree. I had no idea what to do. I felt that I was out of options. I did the best thing I could have ever done for my math education. I discovered a new way of learning and really understanding math! So long, YouTube tutorials!

I was able to jump into a class that offered small classes, personalized help, out of class resources, and teachers who had the time to invest that had a real interest in my personal success and struggles. It is amazing how my view of math changed because I was finally able to get a grasp of what was actually happening. Why “x” moved to the right side of the equation, why that 3 becomes negative, and even how to read the trig wheel. Commonly I hear from students looking in to AcerPlacer, “Now I know that you work there, so you have to tell me that this program works, but will this program really help me test out and understand math?” I love that I can say, “Believe me, I know first hand that math can be a very difficult educational hurdle, but you are in the right place!”

AcerPlacer instructors have math-loving hearts of gold. They take the time and are truly invested in getting to know your learning style, your educational goals, and are always a great math support. They provide encouragement, comfort, math jokes, and bring not only their math experience, but also teaching methods that can unlock and help students grasp concepts. Each class is capped at 8 students per room so that it was easy to get the help I needed while in class. I could ask my instructor to repeat the material, say it a different way, and associate it with a story. The best part was that I never felt like a burden and I never felt out of place asking questions. I was completely comfortable admitting my wrong answers and thought process. For myself, it was the invested staff of instructors and the small personalized classes that helped me unlock so many math doors.

This program was the change that myself and many struggling students need! AcerPlacer was a game changer for me, and I love that I get to be a part of a team that helps students finish their college math requirements! So as the AcerPlacer t-shirts say… “Math is nothing to b² of”!


References:

  • Adelman, Clifford. (1999, June). Answers in the Tool Box. Academic Intensity, Attendance Patterns, and Bachelor’s Degree Attainment. Education Publications Center (ED Pubs). Retrieved from https://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED431363.pdf
  • Gewertz, Catherine. (2018). Avoiding a Remedial-Math Roadblock to a Degree. Education Week, 37(32), 14–15.

Additional Reading:

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