Guest Post: Strength in Numbers

Ryan Brown is an instructor at AcerPlacer and is working on a BS in mathematics with a minor in secondary education. He is also an avid rock climber.

After teaching various types of mathematics, I have been asked countless times by students, “ When are we ever going to use this?” This question is asked when trying to isolate specific variables, simplify rational expressions, or evaluate complex numbers. Some answers that are given are very arduous and stretching quite far. Some ideas and concepts may not have a proper answer to the student, but in the complex world that we live in all that we have was designed using mathematics. Everything from the car we drive to the cell phone in our pockets – someone performed innumerable amount of math equations to see the safest design of a car, or perform tests to see how to make the battery in our phones last longer. All around us is magnificent architecture that was not just imagined and then someone starting digging the hole. There was intense preparation that went into each structure before we ever see the physical building and foundation being built.

Taking another stance on the exercise that mathematics provides the human brain is extremely powerful! Learning mathematics helps your learning skills on many levels. It helps you learn deeply and focus on tasks at hand. It helps to keep you organized and learn complex concepts without giving up easily. The human brain’s frontal lobe is not done developing until about age 25; the more we learn by that time, the more we can retain and remember. Mathematics is one of the best ways to train our brain how to remember the most information in the shortest amount of time. Our brains retain about 90% of the information that is input when we teach someone or try ourselves to perform a given task. Why mathematics helps us learn this form of learning so quickly is because we are given instant results and answers back in math. The second we make a mistake, we often cannot proceed with the equation, or our answer is not provided as an option. We don’t like to make mistakes; that is why we often take the easy way out and try to do a form of studying where we cannot make mistakes, like reading and listening to audios, which has a 5% retention for our brain.

To finish up the point of this article is that we use math everyday. We see the benefits of math everywhere. Our brain needs complex problem solving to stay young and active. We can mimic the study plan with math with all other courses to help us save time and energy. I hope this article was worth your time! Thank you for reading!

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